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PA Homes for Sale

This website is a great resource for PA homes for sale. You can perform a MLS search and anywhere else in surrounding Dauphin County PA areas, including where is located. Of course, it's best to include a search for PA Realtors in your home process, since a team of real estate professionals are your best resource for service and professionalism. We recommend the services of Coldwell Banker - contact a Coldwell Banker Realtor here. This is also true of you have a home in that you are thinking about selling, you can trust the power of Coldwell Banker in the area! What's your home worth? Check PA home prices and ask for a personal quote.

Foreclosures in PA are on the market and available for purchase, you just have to know how to find them. Professional Realtors can assist in your foreclosure search and offer valuable help in the negotiation process. A home inspection entails many important details and can make or break a sale. Read your report carefully! Buying a foreclosed home can save you many thousands of dollars.

Another important part of a search for homes for sale in PA is the mortgage; use the resources available on this website to guide you through the process of obtaining a PA mortgage and checking PA mortgage rates. Closing on your home can be handled by the title experts at Guardian Transfer


Dauphin County, Pennsylvania

Dauphin County is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and is one of the three counties comprising the Harrisburg–Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of 2004, the population was estimated at 253,282. The county includes the city of Harrisburg, which has served as the state capital since 1812.

Dauphin County was created on March 4, 1785, from part of Lancaster County and was named after Louis-Joseph, Dauphin of France the first son of Louis XVI. Louis-Joseph's title of Dauphin signified that he was the heir apparent to the throne of France. The county seat is Harrisburg.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 558 square miles, of which, 525 square miles of it is land and 32 square miles of it (5.78%) is water. The county is bound to its western border by the Susquehanna River.


Lebanon County, Pennsylvania

Autumn Forest Lebanon County Pennsylvania

Lebanon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. Though the first settlers were located there in 1723, it was officially created in 1813 from parts of Dauphin County and Lancaster County. Just like the surrounding counties, Lebanon County Pennsylvania has had a large influence from the Pennsylvania Dutch, which is easily seen in the acres upon acres of beautiful landscaping and farms. Lebanon County is also known for its outstanding abundance of dairy and pork products, the most popular of which is their Lebanon Bologna.

As of 2000, the population is 120,327, with a 2004 estimate of 124,489. Its county seat is Lebanon. Lebanon County is part of the Lebanon Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Harrisburg–Carlisle–Lebanon Combined Statistical Area. It is located in south central Pennsylvania approximately 25 miles east of the state capital of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 363 square miles, of which, 362 square miles of it is land and 1 square miles of it (0.20%) is water. Its average annual temperature is 50 degrees and average precipitation is almost 36 inches.


York County, Pennsylvania

York County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of 2004, the estimated population was 401,613. York County is located in the Susquehanna Valley, a large fertile agricultural region in South Central Pennsylvania.

York County was created on August 19, 1749, from part of Lancaster County and named either for the Duke of York, an early patron of the Penn family, or for the city and shire of York in England. Its county seat is the city of York.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 910 square miles, of which, 904 square miles of it is land and 6 square miles of it (0.64%) is water. The county is bound to its eastern border by the Susquehanna River. Its southern border is the Mason-Dixon Line, which separates Pennsylvania and Maryland.

The York-Hanover Metropolitan Statistical Area is the fastest-growing metro area in the Northeast region, and is ranked nationally among the fastest-growing in the nation, according to the "2006 Population Estimates for Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas" (U.S. Census Bureau). The estimates listed York-Hanover as the 95th fastest-growing metro area in the nation, increasing 9.1 percent between 2000 and 2006.


Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

Cumberland County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and is one of three counties comprising the Harrisburg–Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of 2004, the population was estimated at 221,397.

Cumberland County was created on January 27, 1750, and named after Cumberland, England. Its county seat is Carlisle. The county also lies within the Cumberland Valley adjoining the Susquehanna River at its eastern border, stretching approximately 42 miles from the borough of Shippensburg on the west to the Susquehanna River in east Cumberland County.

Cumberland County was first settled by Scotch Irish immigrants who arrived in this area in about 1730. The Scotch Irish were the earliest settlers on the Pennsylvania frontier of the early 1700s. These settlers built the Middle Spring Presbyterian Church in 1738 near present day Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, which is one of the oldest churches in central Pennsylvania.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 551 square miles, of which, 550 square miles of it is land and 1 square miles of it (0.18%) is water.


Cocalico School District

The Cocalico School District is a school district of 3531 students educated in 6 schools by 209 teachers in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13. Geographically, the school district includes the boroughs of Denver and Adamstown, as well as East Cocalico and West Cocalico townships. The census-designated place of Reamstown is located within East Cocalico Township.


Columbia Borough School District

The Columbia Borough School District is a school district of 1443 students educated in 3 schools in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Conestoga Valley School District

The Conestoga Valley School District is a school district in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Donegal School District

The Donegal School District is a school district in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Eastern Lancaster County School District

The Eastern Lancaster County School District ("Elanco") is a school district in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Elizabethtown Area School District

The Elizabethtown Area School District is a school district in the Northwest corner of suburban Lancaster County, Pennsylvania that serves Elizabethown Borough and the townships of Conoy, and West Donegal, as well as the North and West part of Mount Joy Township. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Ephrata Area School District

The Ephrata Area School District is a school district in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Hempfield School District

The Hempfield School District is a school district of 7218 students educated in 10 schools by 420 teachers in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13. Hempfield school has many different extra curricular activities such as but not limiting to; Football, baseball, Track and Field, Cheerleading, Swimming, Dance and Arts.


Lampeter-Strasburg School District

The Lampeter-Strasburg School District is a school district in rural and suburban Lancaster County, Pennsylvania that serves the borough of Strasburg, as well as Strasburg and West Lampeter Townships. The census-designated place of Willow Street is mostly in the district.


School District of Lancaster

The School District of Lancaster is a school district of 11,300 students educated in 19 schools in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Established in 1836, it is the second oldest school district in the state. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Manheim Central School District

The Manheim Central School District is a school district of 3,111 students educated in eight schools in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13. It is also the home of the 2006 Pennsylvania AA Eastern State Soccer Champions and the 2003 Pennsylvania AAA State Football Champions.


Manheim Township School District

The Manheim Township School District is a school district in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Penn Manor School District

The Penn Manor School District is a school district of 5332 students educated in 10 schools in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Pequea Valley School District

The Pequea Valley School District is a school district of 1927 students educated in 5 schools by 123 teachers in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13.


Solanco School District

Solanco School District is in the southern end of Lancaster County (SoLanCo), Pennsylvania. There are currently seven schools in Solanco: four elementary, two middle/junior high and one high school.


Warwick School District

Warwick School District is located in Lititz, Pennsylvania. The school district has a superintendent, assistant superintendent and a business manager. It serves Elizabeth Township, Warwick Township, and Lititz Borough. It contains six schools, which include Warwick High School, Warwick Middle School, John Beck Elementary School, John Bonfield Elementary School, Kissel Hill Elementary School and Lititz Elementary School.

Its school colors are red and black. Its mascot is the warrior. It is a member of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association competing in Class AAA in most sports.

In 2005, Warwick High School's boys' soccer team won the Class AAA championship in the Pennsylvania state tournament, defeating the West Chester Henderson Warriors 1-0.


Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, known as the Garden Spot of America since the 18th century, is located in the southeastern part of the state of Pennsylvania. The city of Lancaster is the county seat.

North Duke Street in Lancaster, PennsylvaniaLancaster County is a popular tourist destination, due mostly to the many plain sect residents, known as the Amish or Pennsylvania Dutch. The term 'Pennsylvania Dutch' comes from the earlier use of "Dutch" to apply to all immigrants from middle Europe. They are the descendants of Germans who immigrated in the 18th and 19th centuries for the freedom of religion offered by William Penn, and were attracted by the rich soil and mild climate of the area.

Lancaster County PA Covered BridgeLancastrians can easily spot a visitor to the area by how they pronounce the word Lancaster. Locals and people from nearby counties in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware pronounce Lancaster as LANK-ister. This is unusual as most Lancasters in the United States are pronounced as LAN-cast-er, though Lancashire, England, and Lancasters in Texas, Ohio, and South Carolina also use the LANK-ister pronunciation. The inhabitants of Lancaster County speak with the Susquehanna dialect. The Susquehanna dialect is most commonly used in the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg areas, and incorporates influences from the Philadelphia accent and that of the Pennsylvania Dutch.

As of 2005, there were 490,562 residents in Lancaster County, representing 4.2% growth since 2000 and 11.3% growth since 1990.


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